Cal-Earth’s Sustainable Architecture

The California Institute of Earth Architecture hopes their Superadobe construction technique may be applied to more traditional contemporary homes found throughout SoCal suburbs.

 

Post by KCETOnline

Cal-Earth’s coiled Superadobe forms arches, domes, vaults, and apses using local materials are easy and cheap to come by. Overall construction of Superadobe is inexpensive, affordable, and sustainable to build. Construction techniques may be taught to local laborers in a matter of days providing them with supplemental labor skills. Aesthetically the dome structures are not only beautiful to view but are also incredibly strong, fire resistant, and heavily insulated from the elements due to the Superadobe construction. Cal-Earth sandbag structures have passed California’s rigorous seismic building codes making them stable during an earthquake. Apprentices and associates from Cal-Earth have trained and overseen the building of a variety of Cal-Earth structures on nearly every continent.

Indeed, it seems that Hooman is more than often traveling the world than at his home base in nearby Apple Valley training others in the Superadobe construction technique developed by Cal-Earth. One such project that he has participated in with other Cal-Earth associates in the Tribewanted Sierra Leone eco-community at John Obey Beach. Tribewanted formed a partnership with the Sierra Leone government, landowners and the local John Obey community to build this sustainable eco-resort whose profits will “be re-invested in the local John Obey community, in education and microfinance through Shine On Sierra Leone.”

Categories: ArchΤravel, Construction & Materials, Landscape, Public, Residents, Temporary, Town Plans Urbanism

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